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Chris Royle
I am a retired Biomedical Scientist (40+ years in the NHS clinical laboratory service) with a life long passion for aviation. This passion was started when my father took me to the 1953 SBAC show at Farnborough.

I was hooked by the sights, sounds and smells of the day, and I remember us attending just about every year's show up until about 1963, which was when I took up playing bass guitar in a Shadows type group. This continued until 1976, causing my aviation interests to take a bit of a back seat. What fun those days were! I remember my first modelling forays with Airfix 2/- bagged kits from Woolworth's. The Spitfire and Whirlwind helicopter were early models that I can recall building. I can still recall the excitement of going in to Woolies and seeing a new kit hung on the rack.

Frog models were also attractive, in sturdy boxes with very evocative box art. Such models as the English Electric P1A (predecessor of the Lightning) and the N113 (prototype Supermarine Scimitar) were to die for, but were relatively expensive (5/11 if my memory serves me). Imported American kits (Linbergh and Aurora I can remember) were completely out of the range of my pocket. I also built Veron and Keil Kraft balsa and tissue flying models, but these were generally less than successful, but good fun to build nonetheless.

Relatively late in life I achieved an ambition of getting a PPL, and I now have a 1/12th share in a Piper Cherokee based at White Waltham. I have nearly 1000 hours with instrument and instructor ratings, and fly as often as time, weather and funds permit. One way or another, aviation has been a fairly dominant feature in my life! However, I also have a great liking for steam locomotives. Having been born and bred in Devon, I have a particular liking for those of the GWR.

I never lost my interest in modelling, and although the basics are the same as they were 50 or so years ago, the range and detail of after market items available is bewildering. I am looking forward to spending time "torturing plastic" again after all these years.
Biggin Hill
Biggin Hill
Dans la Mer(de)
Dans la Mer(de)
2-6-2T 61xx class loco
2-6-2T 61xx class loco
Evening Star
Evening Star
RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch
RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch
Stanier Corridor
Stanier Corridor
Sea Hawk F1
Sea Hawk F1
Hunter FGA9
Hunter FGA9
Scimitar
Scimitar
De Havilland Heron
De Havilland Heron
Mogul 2-6-0
Mogul 2-6-0
Type VIIC U-boat
Type VIIC U-boat
City of Truro
City of Truro
Hunter F.4
Hunter F.4
Bristol Mk.32 Superfreighter
Bristol Mk.32 Superfreighter
Percival Provost
Percival Provost
Mosquito
Mosquito
1930 Bentley
1930 Bentley
Supermarine Swift
Supermarine Swift
Douglas DC-3
Douglas DC-3
Spitfire TR9
Spitfire TR9
Fiat Mephistopheles
Fiat Mephistopheles
AEC Routemaster
AEC Routemaster
Bugatti 100P
Bugatti 100P
RMS Mauretania
RMS Mauretania
Red Arrows Hawk
Red Arrows Hawk
Fairey Gannet
Fairey Gannet
Gloster Javelin FAW9
Gloster Javelin FAW9
Avro Shackleton
Avro Shackleton
Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza
Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza
Lightning T5
Lightning T5
Hunter FGA9
Hunter FGA9
Hawker Sea Fury
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Biggin Hill
00 scale Battle of Britain Class loco “Biggin Hill” in British Railways (SR) livery circa early 1960s. The kit was originally available in the late 1950s / early 1960s under the Rosebud trademark, and then succesively marketed by Kitmaster, then Airfix and nowadays by Dapol. Built out of the box but with some additional scratchbuilt pipework and brake linkage mechanism. ModelMaster transfers and nameplates replaced the rather dated items supplied with the kit.
Dans la Mer(de)
Heller Breguet Alize - 1/100th scale. Entry for 2012 6 Month Competition. After a paint spraying disaster, the opportunity for something a little more creative presented itself.
2-6-2T 61xx class loco
British Railways (Western Region) 2-6-2T 61xx class locomotive. 00 (4mm) scale. Built out of the bag from the Dapol kit (ex Rosebud, Kitmaster and Airfix) with the addition of Fox Transfers' numberplates and BR totem.

These locos were built for commuter services in the London area. Typical duties were Paddington to Aylesbury via High Wycombe, and from the same terminus to Oxford, Windsor, Reading and Basingstoke.
Evening Star
This is 92220 “Evening Star”, a class 9F heavy freight loco, another in the Rosebud / KitMaster / Airfix / Dapol range of 00 gauge plastic kits.

This was the final steam locomotive built by British Railways at Swindon in 1960. It was withdrawn from service in 1968 and is now preserved at the National Rail Museum in York. Built out of the bag, but with Fox lining decals, etched nameplates and smokebox number.
RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch
RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch - 1/72nd scale scale Airfix kit of the British Power Boats Type 2 high-speed RAF Air - Sea Rescue (ASR) launch, known as the "Whaleback" from the distinctive shape of the deck and the beautiful sculpted lines of the hull.
Powered by 3 Napier Sea Lion engines of 500 hp each, the 63ft long boat had a maximum speed of around 36 knots with a range of about 500 miles. Defensive armament was provided by 2 turret mounted 0.303 Vickers machine guns, twin machine guns mounted on either side of the pilot house and a 20 mm Oerlikon cannon on the rear deck. The crew consisted of Captain, medical orderly and 7 sailors.
The RAF ASR motto was “The Sea Shall Not Have Them”, and many aircrews owed their lives to the ability of the launch and its crews to be able to detect and rescue them with speed and efficiency. The model was built out of the box with the addition of Ez-Line for the rigging.
Stanier Corridor
Stanier Corridor Brake Coach, Dapol OO scale, OOB build.

William Stanier (1876-1965) became Chief Mechanical Engineer of the London Midland and Scottish (LMS) Railways in 1932. Soon after his appointment, he focused on refurbishing and standardising the coaching stock of the LMS and developed coaches that later became known as Stanier Coaches. These designs were extremely popular and successful and many were still in service in the mid 1960’s. There are many examples of these coaches operating on Heritage Railways throughout the UK today.
This Dapol OO gauge model of a 57 foot Stanier Corridor Brake Coach (BR Midland region, ex LMS) is derived from refurbished Airfix / Mainline / Rosebud tooling purchased by Dapol in the 1980s.
The model was built out of the box with addition of some internal glazing.
Sea Hawk F1
Hawker Sea Hawk F1 - Frog, 1/72nd scale.

The Hawker Sea Hawk F1 first flew in 1951, entering service with the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm (FAA) two years later with 806 Squadron.
The F1 was armed with four 20mm Hispano Mk V cannons. It was powered by a single 5,000 lbf thrust Rolls-Royce Nene 101 turbojet. The F1 had a maximum speed of 599 mph at sea level and a range of 800 miles on internal fuel. It is considered by many as one of the most elegant of Sydney Camm’s designs.
This kit was produced by Frog in the early 1950s and represented the cutting edge of kits in its day. The model has been built out of the box, deleting the undercarriage and the moulded pilot’s head, but with addition of Modeldecal transfers. Finishing is a mixture of Humbrol aerosol spray and brush painted enamels.
Hunter FGA9
Hawker Hunter FGA9, Frog, 1/72nd scale.

This is the 1970s Frog kit of Sydney Camm’s Hawker Hunter, surely the most beautiful of jet fighters ever built? First flown in 1951, Hunters are still being used actively in the 21st century. The model was built OOB, using Humbrol aerosol paints with markings representing an aircraft of 54 Squadron RAF, based at West Raynham in 1968. Although an elderly kit, it still captures the classic lines of this aircraft.
Scimitar
Vickers Supermarine Scimitar FI. Xtrakit, 1/72nd scale.

The model is built OOB, with the exception of lowering the flaps and the leading edge slats. The Scimitar was a twin engined transonic Naval strike fighter, later used in the aerial tanker role. The markings represent this aircraft XD321 when it served with 800 Naval Air Squadron aboard HMS Eagle in 1964.
De Havilland Heron
De Havilland Heron, Airfix 1/72nd scale.

This Airfix 1/72nd scale kit of the De Havilland DH114 Heron was first released in 1958. An excellent kit in its day, it still builds into an accurate and pleasing replica of this elegant 4-engined light transport aircraft. The type was used by many airlines around the world, but also by the RAF’s Queen’s Flight, and in the case of this aircraft, G-AORG, by the Royal Navy for over 20 years. This model was built out of the box, painted with Humbrol spray enamels and decorated using the kit transfers.
You can see a video of this particular aircraft here (YouTube).
Mogul 2-6-0
BR Standard 4 Mogul 2-6-0 ca 1950, Dapol, OO/HO Scale.

This is another one of the Dapol (ex Rosebud / Airfix) range of OO / HO scale steam locomotive kits. The moulds must be at least 50 years old now, and the kit shows its age, but nevertheless it makes up into a pleasing rendition of one of British Railway’s standardised designs of the 1950s that were to be found on general haulage duties in the North West and Scotland. The appellation "Mogul" was given to locos having a 2-6-0 wheel arrangement.
Built OOB with additional Fox and Modelmaster transfers.
Type VIIC U-boat
Type VIIC U-boat, U203. Revell 1/72nd scale.
This is Revell’s big kit (1.1 metre long) of the Type VIIC U-boat (unterseeboot). The model was built oob and was finished with a variety of Humbrol acrylic spray and brush paints. I used Ez - line for the rigging and Humbrol weathering powders and washes. The kit is superb and goes together very well. The only challenge is dealing with the size of the model.
U203 met her end in the North Atlantic on 25 th April 1943 when she was sunk by a Fairey Swordfish aircraft of 811 Fleet Air Arm squadron flying from HMS Biter. The U boat “Wolf packs” were rightly feared by the crews of ships sailing on North Atlantic convoys. However, as aircraft radar capabilities improved and RAF Coastal Command aircraft became more capable, the pendulum swung in favour of the Allies and increasing numbers of U boats were sunk. By the end of the war, 28,000 German U boat sailors had been lost at sea, representing no less than 70% of the 40,000 U boat crews.
City of Truro
City of Truro locomotive, Dapol, OO scale.

City of Truro was built at Swindon in 1903 for the Great Western Railway (GWR) company to a design by George Churchward. It was partially rebuilt in 1911 and 1915, and renumbered 3717 in 1912. Whilst hauling the "Ocean Mails" special from Plymouth to London Paddington on 9 May 1904, City of Truro was timed at 8.8 seconds between two quarter-mile posts, corresponding to a speed of 102.3 mph (164.6 km/h). In the light of this, some consider the locomotive was the first to attain the speed of 100 miles per hour (160.9 km/h). Since then, this claim has been the subject of debate.
This OO scale kit is one of the surviving ex Rosebud / Kitmaster / Airfix range, now produced by Dapol. It was built “out of the bag” with no modifications apart from Modelmaster nameplates, transfers and numberplates.
Hunter F.4
Hawker Hunter F.4, WV322 in 43 (Fighting Cocks) Squadron colours ca. 1957. Academy, 1/48th scale kit.

This is a single seat Hawker Hunter F4, WV322. In 1959, she was returned to Hawker at Blackpool for conversion to a 2 seat T8C for the Royal Navy to be used as a Buccaneer pilot trainer. Service with the RAF followed before being sold to a private owner in 2001. I was fortunate to have a flight in WV322 as a 60th birthday present in 2007. It is my future intention to build a model of this aircraft in its 2 seat form when I flew in her.
The model is the Academy 1/48th kit. Conversion work required removal of the wing leading edge extensions and modifications to the tailpipe. I used Fantasy print shop transfers to supplement those in the kit.
On the bench at the moment is a Bristol Superfreighter (aka by pilots as the Bristol Frightener), surely one of the ugliest aircraft to fly?
Bristol Mk.32 Superfreighter
Bristol Mk.32 Superfreighter, Airfix, 1/72nd scale.

My latest build of the old Airfix kit - I can remember building this kit as a boy, 55 - 60 years ago! - of the Bristol Mk32 Superfreighter, known to pilots, with much justification it seems, as the Bristol Frightener, (or more affectionately as Biffo....remember the comic character Biffo the Bear in the Beano) as its single engine handling was challenging to say the least!
The kit was built OOB, using Halfords and Humbrol aerosol sprays, with Silver City transfers by S and M Decals. The 2 cars (Mini Cooper and Morris 1000 convertible) are 1/72nd scale by Cararama and Classix Transport Treasures respectively.
In service the aircraft could accommodate 3 family sized cars (that's 1950's size cars!) and up to 20 passengers on routes from the Kent coast to northern France. Many people have fond memories watching these aircraft at Lydd and Lympne airports. Competition from cross Channel ferries eventually drove the service out of business.
Percival Provost
Pervical Provost T1, Matchbox, 1/72nd scale.

This is the Percival Provost T1, built OOB from an ancient Matchbox kit, representing an aircraft of the Central Flying School based at Little Rissington. Matchbox were quite adventurous with their choice of subjects, moulding their kits in 2 or 3 colours for those who felt disinclined to paint their model. However, they were generally accurate but characterised by deeply engraved panel lines. The Provost entered service with the RAF in 1953, replacing the unloved and unlovely Percival Prentice. Powered by a 550hp Alvis Leonides radial engine, it was a fully aerobatic advanced trainer, serving the RAF until replaced by its jet powered development, the Jet Provost.
Mosquito
Airfix 1/48th dH Mosquito PRXV1.

Built out of the box. The kit shows its age but nothing can detract from the beautiful lines of "The Wooden Wonder". Decals by Airfix, Xtracrylic PRU blue brush painted. The canopy was a real challenge.
1930 Bentley
This is the Airfix 1/12th scale 1930 4.5 litre “Blower” Bentley.
Built out of the box but with addition of wire mesh fronting the radiator, carburettors, fuel tank and headlights.
Paints were Humbrol aerosols.The kit is in many ways straightforward to build, but I had a number of problems, the main challenge being to align the radiator and the bonnet.
This model represents one of a team of 3 similar cars entered by Sir Henry “Tim” Birkin in the 1930 Le Mans 24-hour road race. Birkin had worked with supercharger expert Amherst Villiers to modify the standard 4.5 litre Bentley, achieving a power output of 240 bhp in comparison to the 110 bhp of the standard unblown 4.5 litre engine. However, W.O.Bentley’s prediction of the unreliability of the supercharged engine came true, with the car having to retire after 20 hours due to engine problems.
Having a wheelbase of 3 metres and weighing almost 2 tonnes, the Bentleys were christened “les camions plus vite” (racing lorries).
Supermarine Swift
Supermarine Swift FR5 1/72 model by Xtrakit
The Supermarine Swift entered service with the RAF in 1954, after a protracted development.
Like its stablemate, the Hawker Hunter, the Swift initially suffered from a variety of aerodynamic and equipment problems. Early versions were quickly withdrawn, but after extensive development, the FR5 emerged, entering RAF service in 1956.
In the photo-reconnaissance role, the Swift finally began to show promise as a Cold War warrior, eventually serving with distinction with RAF Germany until superseded by Hunter FR10s in 1961. Some kits are an enjoyable build. This one, for me, was not one of them. I built the kit “out of the box” and used a mixture of Tamiya acrylic brush painting and trusty Humbrol aerosols. The decals were a nightmare, either refusing to part company from the backing paper, or annoyingly, then folding themselves into a tight ball or worse, fragmenting into small pieces floating around the saucer of water! The markings represent an aircraft serving with 2 Sqn. ca. 1961.
Douglas DC-3
Douglas DC-3 Dakota 1/72nd scale
These aircraft were known in British European Airways (BEA, which some said stood for “Back Every Afternoon”) service as the “Pionair”. They served BEA well in the late 1940s and 1950s. It was said that the only replacement for the DC3 was another DC3! This is the Airfix 1/72nd kit built OOB but with Aircraft in Miniature Transport Wings transfers. The transfers were a bit of a challenge, being very fragile. However, following some advice from a fellow Club member, a spray coat of clear lacquer improved matters greatly. The kit has been re-tooled and goes together quite well. My first ever flight in an aeroplane was in 1955, aboard a BEA Pionair from Southampton (known then as Eastleigh Airport) to Jersey. The air hostess (as they were then known) gave us barley sugar sweets to suck (to make one swallow and equalise the pressure on the eardrums) and cotton wool to put in one’s ears to reduce the din from the engines! Oh happy days.
Having seen the recently released decal set, I could not resist making the model as a reminder of that flight.
Spitfire TR9
Supermarine Spifire TR9, The model is by the Czech manufacturer AZ Models, and was built “out of the box”.
This is a model of one of a number of 2 seat Spitfires operating from various locations across southern England, providing flight experiences (at a price!) to members of the public.
2 seat Spitfires, based on Mark IX airframes, were built immediately after WWII, for the Indian, Dutch and Irish Air Forces. A small number of these found their way into private hands following military service, and together with a number of new 2 seat conversions, are now doing brisk business. This particular Spitfire Tr9 MJ 627 is operated by The Heritage Hangar at Biggin Hill.
A good friend flew in this aircraft in October 2018, and so I decided to build this model as a memento for him. The kit goes together quite nicely, and to my eye at least, captures the graceful looks of the original, even though the second cockpit is rather bulbous and obtrusive. It was finished with Humbrol and Halfords acrylic aerosol sprays.
Fiat Mephistopheles
The Fiat Mephistopheles (known in Italian as Mefistofele) is a one-off racing car created by Ernest A.D. Eldridge in 1923 by combining a Fiat racing car chassis and Fiat aeroplane engine.
The name is from the demon of the same name, alluding to the infernal noise emitted from the unmuffled engine exhaust.
Eldridge broke the World Land Speed Record on 12 July 1924 with the Mephistopheles, by driving at 146.0 mph in Arpajon France, being the last car to set a land speed record on a public road.
This model was built out of the box from the Italeri 1/12th scale kit with the exception of the drive chains. Having made a total mess of the kit chain components I was driven to buying Tamiya 1/6th scale motorcycle chains, themselves a source of much frustration whilst assembling. The kit is assembled partly with tiny screws and partly with conventional adhesives. Paints are Humbrol aerosols with brushed acrylic in some small areas.
This was a challenging build, not helped by vague and inaccurate instructions. At 500mm long, it’s quite an impressive model.
AEC Routemaster
AEC Routemaster, 1/24 scale OOB
The AEC Routemaster double-decker bus designed by London Transport and built by the Associated Equipment Company (AEC) and Park Royal Vehicles. The first Routemasters entered service with London Transport in February 1956 and the last were withdrawn from regular service in December 2005. However, they can still be seen in service on some “Heritage” routes around London. The instruction booklet is fairly good, but there were some anomalies and vagaries that caused head scratching. Overall, it was great fun to build, the parts fitting beautifully, many not requiring cement to hold together. BUT, when time came for final assembly I found that the front and rear sections would just not fit properly. Eventually, after a lot of squeezing and clamping I got a reasonable fit, but it was an unwelcome end to what had been an enjoyable build. The large decals looked a bit challenging but with the help of Micro Sol, they adhered to the bodywork very well. Paints were Humbrol or Halfords “rattle cans”.
Bugatti 100P
Bugatti 100P 1/48 scale by Planet models OOB
Ettore Bugatti was best known for his luxury road cars and high-performance racing cars. In 1938, in conjunction with his chief engineer, Louis de Monge, he started work on an aircraft design to compete in the Deutsch de la Meurthe Cup Race. The airframe design was revolutionary with two Bugatti car engines driving two contra rotating propellers. The design was revolutionary, but before the aircraft could fly, it was put into storage when the Germans invaded France. After WWII ended, it was sold to an American, who wanted the engines. The airframe eventually found its way to the EAA Pioneer Airport Museum in Oshkosh, Wisconsin where it remains to this day.
This was the first resin kit I have built. The parts count of this Planet Models kit is low, with the wings and fuselage cast as one piece. The one downside is that the canopy is supplied as a vac form which I found difficult to deal with. Fortunately, two are supplied, which was just as well as I made a mess of the first. Humbrol and Halfords spray paints were used. The characteristic Bugatti blue was supplied by a custom aerosol paint supplier.
RMS Mauretania
RMS Mauretania 1/600 scale by Airfix OOB
RMS Mauretania was an ocean liner launched in 1906. She held both the eastbound and westbound Blue Riband speed records for 20 years until 1934 when Cunard White Star retired her.
This is a kit by Airfix, originally issued in 1964. Given the kit’s age, and the scale, detail is adequate and the fit of parts is good. This is the first ship model that I have built, and the completed model is, to me at least, pleasing to the eye, capturing the majestic elegance of liners of those days. I built it OOB, and used Humbrol and Halfords spray paints.
Red Arrows Hawk
BAE Hawk, Revell 1/32 OOB
The BAE Systems Hawk is a British single-engine, jet-powered advanced trainer aircraft. It was first flown at Dunsfold, Surrey, in 1974. It has been used in a training capacity and as a low-cost combat aircraft.
Operators of the Hawk include the Royal Air Force (notably the Red Arrows display team) and a considerable number of foreign military operators. The Hawk is still in production in the UK, with over 900 Hawks sold to 18 operators around the world.
This is the Revell 1/32nd scale kit of the Hawk in RAF Red Arrows colours. It was built out of the box, and finished with Halfords or Humbrol aerosol sprays. The only difficulty I had was when I came to mask up the canopy for painting. Somehow, the adhesive on the masking tape, paint and Revell’s clear styrene produced an irremovable mess. Fortunately, Revell’s spare part service came to the rescue.
Fairey Gannet
Fairey Gannet, 1/72 Frog/Novo
The Fairey Gannet was a British carrier-borne aircraft developed for the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm (FAA) by the Fairey Aviation Company to meet the FAA's carrier borne anti-submarine warfare and strike requirements. It was a mid-wing monoplane with a crew of three, powered by an Armstrong Siddeley Double Mamba engine driving two contra-rotating propellers.
This is the 1/72nd kit produced by Frog in the late 1950s and subsequently by Novo in Russia. It’s very basic, having no cockpit detail, moulded pilot’s heads and no recessed wheel wells. Nonetheless, it makes up into a decent model that looks like a Gannet. I built it out of the box with the only addition being the decals from an Xtradecal sheet to represent an aircraft of 825 Sqn based at RNAS Culdrose in 1957. Paints were Humbrol spray and brushed Xtracrylic.
Gloster Javelin FAW9
Gloster Javelin FAW9 1/72 by Airfix
The Gloster Javelin was a twin-engined T-tailed delta-wing subsonic night and all-weather interceptor aircraft that served with the RAF until the late 1960s. It was introduced in 1956 after a lengthy development period and during its lifetime received several upgrades to its engines, radar and weapons, which included the De Havilland Firestreak air-to-air missile.
This is the Airfix 1/72nd kit, and was built OOB. Kit decals were used and paints were trusty Humbrol and Halfords acrylic sprays.
Avro Shackleton
Avro Shackleton 1/72 model by Frog
The Avro Shackleton was a British long-range maritime patrol aircraft developed during the late 1940s and used by the RAF and the South African Air Force between 1951 and 1991 as part of Britain's military response to the rapid expansion of the Soviet Navy, in particular its submarine force. This is the Frog 1/72nd kit, first released in the early 1960s, and notable for the raised rivets. Notwithstanding this, it still makes up into a decent representation of this impressive aircraft nicknamed “The Growler” in acknowledgement of the sound of its 4 RR Griffon engines. Built out of the box to represent the final mark, an MR3 phase 3 (with auxiliary Viper jet engines) of 206 Squadron RAF. Paints were Humbrol and Halfords spray cans.
Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza
1/12th scale Italeri Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza
The Alfa Romeo 8C is considered one of the most famous sports cars of the 1930’s. The 8C designation referred to the 8-cylinder in-line supercharged engine of 2336 cc. Displaying excellent reliability, the 8C won many international racing car competitions of the period. Its name is inexorably linked with the famous Italian racing driver Tazio Nuvolari who won many competitions in the car, including the Targa Florio race in Sicily and the prestigious Italian Grand Prix at Monza, this victory giving the “Monza” name to the twin seater GP car. This kit was built oob. Instructions were vague in places and colour guidance was minimal to say the least. Nonetheless, it went together quite well, some parts being secured with minute screws and nuts. The car was painted with Halfords Ford Colorado Red. This kit is not cheap, being priced at ca. £150. Just as well that I have built it for a friend who paid for it!
Lightning T5
English Electric (BAC) Lightning T5, 1/72 scale by Matchbox
The English Electric Lightning was a British fighter aircraft that served as an interceptor during the 1960s, 1970s and into the late 1980s. It was the only UK-designed-and-built fighter capable of Mach 2, originally conceived and developed as an interceptor to defend the V bomber airfields from attack by nuclear-armed supersonic Soviet bombers. The Lightning had an exceptional rate of climb, ceiling, and speed, but the limited fuel supply meant that its missions were limited in range.
This is the Matchbox kit of the 2 seat T5 trainer variant. I am not sure how old this kit was, but the price sticker on the box was for £1.10p. Despite its age, it went together well and I built it oob to represent an aircraft of 226 Operational Conversion Unit (OCU) based at Coltishall in 1970. The aircraft wears the markings of its “shadow” squadron, no 145. These markings came from a Modeldecal sheet of similar vintage to the kit.
Hunter FGA9
Hawker Hunter FGA9, 1/32 scale by Revell
Widely regarded as one of the most elegant aircraft, the Hawker Hunter first flew in 1951, serving with the RAF and the FAA from 1954 until the 1990s, fulfilling fighter, reconnaissance, ground attack and training roles. It was widely exported and also built under licence overseas. This is the Revell kit of the Hunter FGA9, the penultimate version to see RAF service. It was built oob, and finished with Humbrol and Halfords aerosol paints. The markings represent an aircraft of 1 Squadron, based at West Raynham in 1963.
I would like to acknowledge the help given by fellow Club member Graham James, who successfully rescued the canopy after I had made a mess of it.
Hawker Sea Fury
Hawker Sea Fury, 1/72 by Frog built 'out of the bag'
The Sea Fury was the last propeller-driven fighter to serve with the Royal Navy and was one of the fastest production aircraft ever built. powered by a 3,000 hp Bristol Centaurus 18-cylinder sleeve valve engine. The Sea Fury entered service in 1947 and was retired from the Fleet Air Arm in 1953. It proved to be a popular aircraft with a number of overseas militaries, and was used during the Korean War.
It represents an aircraft of 802 FAA Squadron embarked on HMS Ocean during the Korean War in 1952. Despite its age, parts fitted well. However, the decals had suffered over time and I had to search my spares box for some replacements. Otherwise, it was an enjoyable build. Paints were Humbrol enamel and Humbrol aerosol spray.